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Walking With a Glacier: Part 5

You Aren't From Around Here!


The rocks that I find along the trail are poetically charged.

This one was found in the same area as the others. I made an  assumption that any rock I picked up along the trail had been left behind by the "Wisconsin Glacier."

But life can be so complicated.

The best guess coming from Burney's Rock Shop tells a different tale.

This rock is an example of "Knife River Flint" which was actually formed in North Dakota. Valuable as trading currency, Native Americans used this high quality rock for tool making purposes.

This rock was not formed in Wisconsin or pushed here by glaciers. 

It walked.

Great data base for information about rocks and minerals:

Posted by Lisa Frank

at 6/01/2017

Walking With a Glacier: Part 5

Jack-in-the-Pulpit with Tulip Petals


Posted by Lisa Frank

at 5/23/2017

Jack-in-the-Pulpit with Tulip Petals

Morels with Tulip Petals


Posted by Lisa Frank

at 5/23/2017

Morels with Tulip Petals

Mushroom Moment: 5/21/17



Posted by Lisa Frank

at 5/21/2017

Mushroom Moment: 5/21/17

Mushroom Moment: 5/14/17



Posted by Lisa Frank

at 5/14/2017

Mushroom Moment: 5/14/17

Mushroom Moment: 5/7/17


Posted by Lisa Frank

at 5/07/2017

Mushroom Moment: 5/7/17

Walking with a Glacier: Part 4

"The Friendly Rocks" 

My best hunches: chert, jasper and agates along the Table Bluff Segment of the Ice Age Trail.



Posted by Lisa Frank

at 5/01/2017

Walking with a Glacier: Part 4

Walking With a Glacier: Part 3

The Ice Age National Scenic Trail

This is where I walk.

The Ice Age National Scenic Trail in Wisconsin is an impressive achievement and its history deserves its own post. 


“Though the work of the glaciers in Wisconsin was completed more than 10,000 years ago, the notion of a hiking trail celebrating the state's Ice Age legacy dates back just a century. The story of the Ice Age Trail is a fascinating mix of vision, conservation, and passion involving both some of Wisconsin's most famous politicians and thousands of private citizens." (IATA)


This 1200-mile foot path loosely traces the edge of the furthest advance of the Wisconsin Glacier’s ice sheet. The landscape interpreted by this trail takes hikers through rich farmlands, prairies and wetlands and into deep, forested areas of white pines and oak. It is one of only 11 designated National Trails in the United States and it’s truly “a good thing.”


The Ice Age Trail Alliance, the volunteer organization that builds and maintains the trail, aims to create a corridor of protected space in the state that anyone can utilize. For more information about this organization, go to http://www.iceagetrail.org/

Posted by Lisa Frank

at 5/01/2017

Walking With a Glacier: Part 3